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Sleep Apnea

To help you get a better understanding of sleep apnea, and understand what questions we might ask, we have put together a simple questionnaire for you. In this survey, you will see a series of questions about how likely you are to doze off during the day. Take a look:

How likely are you to doze off or fall asleep in the following situations? You should rate your chances of dozing off, not just feeling tired.

Sitting and reading

  1. No chance of dozing
  2. Slight chance of dozing
  3. Moderate chance of dozing
  4. High chance of dozing

Watching television

  1. No chance of dozing
  2. Slight chance of dozing
  3. Moderate chance of dozing
  4. High chance of dozing

Sitting inactive in a public space (i.e. a theater or a meeting)

  1. No chance of dozing
  2. Slight chance of dozing
  3. Moderate chance of dozing
  4. High chance of dozing

As a passenger in a car for an hour without a break

  1. No chance of dozing
  2. Slight chance of dozing
  3. Moderate chance of dozing
  4. High chance of dozing

Lying down to rest in the afternoon when circumstances permit

  1. No chance of dozing
  2. Slight chance of dozing
  3. Moderate chance of dozing
  4. High chance of dozing

Sitting and talking to someone

  1. No chance of dozing
  2. Slight chance of dozing
  3. Moderate chance of dozing
  4. High chance of dozing

Sitting quietly after a lunch without alcohol

  1. No chance of dozing
  2. Slight chance of dozing
  3. Moderate chance of dozing
  4. High chance of dozing

In a car, while stopped for a few minutes in traffic

  1. No chance of dozing
  2. Slight chance of dozing
  3. Moderate chance of dozing
  4. High chance of dozing

If you experience a high chance of dozing in most of these situations you might be suffering from sleep apnea. Please contact our office for more information on sleep apnea and how we can help you get a better night’s sleep.

Sleep apnea can lead to a long list of complications in other conditions (as well as its own condition). To expand on this area of the worsening of conditions, sleep apnea has an inability to regulate blood pressure. Just one bout of sleep apnea can impact your ability to regulate blood pressure—only one instance can lead to high blood pressure. So what happens when it continues to occur? It continues to get worse.

What is the connection?

Sleep apnea can result in frequent periods of decreased oxygen levels in the body. This is known as intermittent hypoxia. Just six hours of fluctuating oxygen levels associate with sleep apnea can deteriorate a person’s circulatory system. We know that sleep apnea is linked to high blood pressure and can impact the cardiovascular system in one day.

As little as only six hours of fluctuating oxygen levels can lead to the body’s inability to regulate blood pressure—imagine what would happen after 8 hours. These changes occur instantly in healthy young adults–it’s not something many can prepare themselves for. For those suffering from sleep apnea, interventions should take place as soon as a diagnosis is found.

Contact Dr. Sara at Pinnacle Peak Family Dentistry in North Scottsdale for more information on sleep apnea and the steps you can take toward improving your overall health and well-being.

Let’s cut to the main point of this blog post: sleep apnea can increase your risk of type 2 diabetes. It’s that to the point. Sleep apnea is a condition where a person’s airway becomes partially or completely blocked during sleep. As a result, breathing will stop and start throughout the night. Approximately 13 percent of men and 6 percent of women suffer from moderate to severe undiagnosed sleep apnea. While the percentages might seem small, it is important that we do not ignore them.

What is the Connection?

The World Health Organization states that approximately one in every 10 adults suffers from diabetes. Of those with diabetes, a majority has type 2 diabetes, which is when the body can’t make or process enough of the insulin hormone. For those who have type 2 diabetes, obesity is an increased risk. In addition, sleep apnea is also an increased risk for obesity and vice versa.

We need to place a high amount of focus in preventing sleep apnea. By screening for diabetes if you have sleep apnea, and screening for sleep apnea if you have diabetes, we can take strides in further protection against both conditions. This also holds true for those who are overweight and physically inactive people.

It is important to be aware of the link between sleep apnea and type 2 diabetes. While ongoing research is still being completed, knowing there is a connection is key to protecting your overall health and well-being.

Contact Dr. Sara for more information on how sleep apnea and type 2 diabetes are connected, and how we can help.

Do you know what sleep apnea is? Well, how about the causes of sleep apnea? We are here to help you gain a better understanding of what causes sleep apnea so you can be alert and aware of this condition. By understanding the causes of sleep apnea, you can take the right steps toward improved health and sleep—we know how important that is.

A Recap of Sleep Apnea

Obstructive sleep apnea, (OSA) is the most common type of sleep apnea. It is caused by a blockage of the breathing passage or a collapsed airway. With a blocked airway, it is difficult to breathe—keeping air from traveling freely.

When you’re awake, throat muscles help keep your airway stiff and open so air can flow into your lungs. However, when you are sleeping, these muscles relax, which narrows your throat. Normally, this narrowing of your throat doesn’t prevent air from flowing into and out of your lungs, but when you’re asleep you can’t control the airflow.

The Causes of Sleep Apnea

If you have sleep apnea, your airway can become partially or fully blocked because of the following reasons:

  • Your throat muscles and tongue relax more than normal.
  • Your tongue and tonsils are large compared to the opening into your windpipe.
  • You’re overweight.
  • The shape of your head and neck may cause a smaller airway size in the mouth and throat area.
  • The aging process limits your brain signals’ ability to keep your throat muscles stiff during sleep.

As a result, not enough air flows into your lungs if your airway is partially or fully blocked during sleep. In the end, you or your loved one will experience loud snoring and a drop in your blood oxygen level.

Contact Pinnacle Peak Family Dentistry to learn more about sleep apnea and the causes. Through a better understanding of sleep apnea’s causes, you can get a better night’s sleep.

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